Alabama wildlife division goes 'whole hog' on feral swine control

Biologists from the Alabama Wildlife and Freshwater Fisheries Division load up carcasses of feral swine removed from state Wildlife Management Areas during control operations. The invasive wild pigs cause millions of dollars in property and wildlife damages every year in Alabama.(Courtesy Alabama Wildlife and Freshwater Fisheries Division)
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ALABAMA (AL.com) — Biologists from the Alabama Wildlife and Freshwater Fisheries Division removed a total of 24 feral hogs from a site in Dallas County Sunday, as part of the department's ongoing efforts to tamp down on wild pig populations on state lands.

When the state-managed lands are not being used for hunting due to closed seasons, WFF employees employ traps to attempt to catch entire groups of hogs, called sounders, according to Marianne Hudson, spokesman for the Wildlife Division.

The operation was conducted by WFF biologist Justin Gilchrist and laborer Jacob Armstrong. A photo from the hunt was posted on the division's Facebook page, with the caption declaring "We GO WHOLE HOG in our efforts to remove feral swine from management lands."

Hudson said the Division undertakes many maintenance projects this time of year, including road work, plantings and wildlife management.

"This time of year is busier than hunting season for us," Hudson said. "Trapping feral swine is an important endeavor this time of year."

Feral swine are one of Alabama's most destructive invasive species, causing millions of dollars in property and wildlife damage every year just in Alabama, and an estimated $1.5 billion nationwide.

More on this story at AL.com.
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