Faith and Politics Civil Rights Pilgrimage stops in Selma

Members of Congress were in Selma on Saturday, March 5, 2022. They retraced the footsteps of...
Members of Congress were in Selma on Saturday, March 5, 2022. They retraced the footsteps of Civil Rights activists who walked in the 1965 “Bloody Sunday” march.(Source: WSFA 12 News)
Published: Mar. 5, 2022 at 6:55 PM CST
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Selma, Ala. (WSFA) - Members of Congress were in Selma on Saturday. They retraced the footsteps of Civil Rights activists who walked in the 1965 “Bloody Sunday” march.

They gathered at the center of Edmund Pettus Bridge for a brief ceremony to honor the foot soldiers.

“It’s never lost on me that I get to walk the halls of Congress because of the sacrifices that were made right here on this bridge,” Rep. Terri Sewell said.

It is a part of the annual Faith and Politics Civil Rights Pilgrimage, touring Birmingham, Montgomery and Selma, giving participants a look at some of Alabama’s historical sites.

Members of Congress were on the bridge for the first time since the passing of Civil Rights activist and Rep. John Lewis – who created this event.

It was something sentimental for Sewell, who is from Selma and knew Lewis well.

“When I close my eyes, I was able to recall exactly what John said year after year on the apex of the bridge. I heard him say that we’re in sacred space,” Sewell said

Congressional leaders were not the only ones in attendance the Bridge Crossing Jubilee. Folks traveled from far and wide.

Miesha Age is from Jacksonville, Florida. She made the commute to touch the pavement her aunt, Mary Keeton Flemmings, walked on during the “Bloody Sunday” march.

“For me to come back to where she was… is a moment. It’s something you have to take in,” Age said.

Age, like many others, stands on sacred ground to feel connected to her late aunt and the trailblazers who risked it all for equal voting rights.

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