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Tyndall Air Force Base’s new technology comes in the form of four-legged robots

Tyndall Air Force Base will use these security bots primarily for perimeter defense.
The 325th Fighter Wing will demo robot "dogs" used on base.
The 325th Fighter Wing will demo robot "dogs" used on base.
Published: Nov. 11, 2020 at 4:20 AM CST
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TYNDALL AIR FORCE BASE, Fla. (WJHG) - After Hurricane Michael badly damaged Tyndall Air Force Base’s integrated defense operation, base leaders had to come up with a replacement. What’s being called the base of the future, is putting these futuristic robo dogs to the test. Tyndall Air Force Base will use these security bots primarily for perimeter defense. Ghost Robotics CEO Jiren Parikh said they can be installed with different applications depending on the situation.

“They’ll be fitted with different sensors, cameras, thermal sensors to look at night, infrared. They can also be fitted with gas sensors,” said Parikh.

Parikh said these bots can roam by themselves or be piloted by a controller, as well as other cool tricks. Security Forces Squadron Commander Major Jordan Criss said this is just the springboard into the future. They can use these dogs to sweep large areas instead of using humans.

“The human being is limited in that capacity, but technology and what these dogs can do can far surpass the human being in that aspect, which allows the human being to focus on things the dog can’t,” said Major Criss.

Major Criss said Tyndall will be the first air force base to use these robo dogs.

“Us being the testbed, us testing and evaluating how these dogs will work, we’ll be able to send that information out to a lot of other different agencies so that they can take these applications and specify them for their specific mission needs,” said Major Criss.

The new “pack” of four robots will be installed at Tyndall in January, programmed around February and March and roaming the base by April. When asked if these bots can be used after hurricanes, Parikh said complex applications such as search and rescue will probably take a few more years before they’re ready for that.

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