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Pastor heads to drug rehab as supporters pledge to carry on his mission

“Regardless of what is going on right now we are standing behind him to continue the vision,” said Rodreshia Russaw, executive director of The Ordinary People’s Society.
Leadership of The Ordinary People's Society announce they will continue to support their jailed founder in this September 9, 2020 photo.
Leadership of The Ordinary People's Society announce they will continue to support their jailed founder in this September 9, 2020 photo.(WTV)
Published: Sep. 10, 2020 at 10:24 AM CDT
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DOTHAN, Ala. (WTVY) -Houston County Jail cell doors opened Wednesday and Pastor Kenneth Glasgow walked out. The voting rights activist charged with murder and other crimes isn’t free but he will get a reprieve while receiving drug addiction treatment.

Despite his legal woes, supporters plan to carry on Glasgow’s work, in hopes of getting more people to the polls in the November election.

“Regardless of what is going on right now we are standing behind him to continue the vision,” said Rodreshia Russaw, executive director of The Ordinary People’s Society. TOPS, founded by Glasgow, promotes voter registration of all people, but with an emphasis on convicted felons.

Glasgow, in 2009, also forced Alabama prisons to allow him inside to register inmates convicted of crimes not involving moral turpitude.

“It’s important right now to inspire people to speak out and take part in the process,” Ms. Russaw told WTVY. She noted that, with a slim Democratic ballot, only about 10 percent of minority voters went to the polls last month.

It’s not known if or when Glasgow, civil right’s activist Al Sharpton’s brother, will return to TOPS. He faces a 2018 charge that he aided another man accused of shooting a 23-year old Dothan woman, though Glasgow has not been indicted. He also faces two counts of cocaine possession but lik

Pastor Kenneth Glasgow in court in this 2018 file photo.
Pastor Kenneth Glasgow in court in this 2018 file photo.(WTVY)

ely would not serve jail time on those charges under Alabama’s sentencing guidelines.

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