Day in History: WWII Assault; Waco; Eichmann; Valujet; Fire; Marley; Beatles Guitar; Obit "Women in Film"

By: ap
By: ap
On May 11 -
   
   In 1944, during World War II, Allied forces launched a major offensive against...
   In 1953, a tornado devastated...
   In 1960, Israeli agents captured Nazi war criminal...
   In 1985, 56 people died when a flash fire swept...
   In 1996, an Atlanta-bound ValuJet DC-9 caught fire and crashed into the Everglades, killing...
     in entertainment history -
   In 1970, the three-record "Woodstock" soundtrack...
   In 1981, musician Bob Marley died...

FILE - In this July 4, 1980 file photo, Jamaican Reggae singer Bob Marley performs in front of an audience of 40,000 during a concert in Paris. (AP File Photo)

Today in History
Today is Sunday, May 11, the 131st day of 2014. There are 234 days left in the year. This is Mother's Day.
On May 11 in history –
In 1647, Peter Stuyvesant (STY'-veh-suhnt) arrived in New Amsterdam to become governor of New Netherland.
In 1858, Minnesota became the 32nd state of the Union.
In 1862, during the Civil War, the Confederate ironclad CSS Virginia was scuttled by its crew off Craney Island, Virginia, to prevent it from falling into Union hands.
In 1935, the Rural Electrification Administration was created as one of President Franklin D. Roosevelt's New Deal programs.
In 1944, during World War II, Allied forces launched a major offensive against Axis lines in Italy.
In 1953, a tornado devastated Waco, Texas, claiming 114 lives.
In 1960, Israeli agents captured Nazi war criminal Adolf Eichmann in Buenos Aires, Argentina.
In 1973, the espionage trial of Daniel Ellsberg and Anthony Russo in the "Pentagon Papers" case came to an end as Judge William M. Byrne dismissed all charges, citing government misconduct.
In 1985, 56 people died when a flash fire swept a jam-packed soccer stadium in Bradford, England.
In 1994, Arkansas put to death convicted murderers Jonas Whitmore and Edward Charles Pickens; it was the first time a state executed two people on the same day since the U.S. Supreme Court allowed states to restore the death penalty in 1976.
In 1996, an Atlanta-bound ValuJet DC-9 caught fire shortly after takeoff from Miami and crashed into the Florida Everglades, killing all 110 people on board.

In entertainment history –

In 1927, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences was founded during a banquet at the Biltmore Hotel in Los Angeles.
In 1970, the three-record "Woodstock" soundtrack was released. It went gold within two weeks.
In 1972, John Lennon said on "The Dick Cavett Show" that he thought he had been followed and had had his phone tapped the past few months.
In 1979, Peaches and Herb received a platinum record for "Reunited."
In 1981, musician Bob Marley died in a Miami hospital of a brain tumor at the age of 36. The previous fall, he had collapsed on stage.
In 1989, the final first-run episode of "Dynasty" aired on ABC-TV.
In 1990, singer Richie Valens was posthumously awarded a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.
In 1991, Pearl Jam first started recording their debut album, "Ten."

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Beatles Rickenbacker guitar coming to auction
NEW YORK (AP) -- A guitar owned by George Harrison is heading to auction along with other Beatles and rock memorabilia.
The Julien's Auctions sale is May 17 at the Hard Rock Cafe in Manhattan. The 1962 Rickenbacker 425 is estimated to bring up to $600,000.
Harrison purchased the guitar in 1963 at Fenton's Music store in Mount Vernon, Illinois. He had gone there to visit his sister.
He had the guitar refinished from a Fireglo red to black to match John Lennon's Rickenbacker.
The auction also has a "Beatles '65" album signed by the Fab Four. It could bring up to $300,000. The auction house says any albums signed after Beatlemania began in 1964 are extremely rare.
Other highlights include Jimi Hendrix's Sears Silvertone electric guitar. Its presale estimate is up to $100,000.

'Bionic Woman' producer Nancy Malone dies at 79
LOS ANGELES (AP) -- Veteran actress, director and producer Nancy Malone has died at age 79 in Los Angeles.
Malone's representative, Harlan Boll, says she died Thursday from complications attributed to leukemia.
She was a producer of the 1970s series "The Bionic Woman" and directed episodes of numerous TV shows, including "Melrose Place" and "Diagnosis Murder."
She starred in the groundbreaking 1950s series, "Naked City," and appeared in dozens of TV and film roles as well as on live radio.
She was a co-founder of Women in Film. Malone made her Broadway debut at 17 co-starring with Melvyn Douglas in the comedy "Time Out for Ginger."
She began her career as a child model. At 10, she was chosen for the cover of Life magazine's 10th Anniversary issue, depicting "The Typical American Girl."


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