Louisiana Scientist's Oysters Safe from Oil, but Pricey

By: Cain Burdeau
By: Cain Burdeau
Four months after the Gulf of Mexico oil spill, biologist John Supan

Courtesy: NOAA

GRAND ISLE, La. (AP) - (AP) - Four months after the Gulf of Mexico oil spill, biologist John Supan's oysters may offer the Gulf oyster industry a chance for a long-term recovery.

But his breed of modified oysters, which some say are prohibitively expensive, could be a hard sell to an industry reeling from the BP disaster.

Supan's oysters are bred for performance, to deal with viruses and other contaminants. But the most crucial advantage this year was their mobility.

Unlike most Gulf oysters, which live on the bottom, Supan's oysters dangle in the water in cages. When the Deepwater Horizon exploded April 20, the Louisiana State University oyster biologist evacuated his broods.

He hopes his method will catch on with Gulf oystermen. But some
say it's too costly.

(Copyright 2010 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)


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