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Cold Snap Causes Iguanas To Fall From Trees

In this photo released by the U.S. Attorneys Office, a recovered Fiji Island banded iguana that was seized from a suspect's Long Beach, Calif., home by officials from the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service is shown Friday Sept. 21, 2007. Prosecutors allege the suspect, Jereme James, stole three hatchling Fiji Island banded iguanas in 2002 and brought them to the United States by concealing them in his prosthetic leg. (AP Photo/U.S. Attorney's Office)

In this photo released by the U.S. Attorneys Office, a recovered Fiji Island banded iguana that was seized from a suspect's Long Beach, Calif., home by officials from the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service is shown Friday Sept. 21, 2007. Prosecutors allege the suspect, Jereme James, stole three hatchling Fiji Island banded iguanas in 2002 and brought them to the United States by concealing them in his prosthetic leg. (AP Photo/U.S. Attorney's Office)

NAPLES, Fla. (AP) - The chilly weather in southern Florida this
week was cold enough to force some iguanas to fall from trees.

Experts say the cold-blooded reptiles go into a deep sleep when
the temperature falls into the 40s. Their bodies basically shut off
and they lose their grip on the tree.

According to Collier County Domestic Animal Services control
supervisor Dana Alger, iguana reports traditionally rise when
temperatures drop, as the reptiles seek to warm themselves on
asphalt surfaces such as sidewalks, roads and driveways.

Most of the iguanas were once pets that got released when they
got too big. The reptiles can grow up to six feet long.


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