By: Associated Press
By: Associated Press
There are plenty of ways that Georgia can replace
water from Lake Lanier if a federal judge turns off the tap for
metro-Atlanta.

FILE - In a Tuesday, Oct 7, 2008 file photo, men fish from the exposed shore at Lake Lanier in Buford, Ga. Lake Lanier is the main source of water for Atlanta. A Friday, July 17, 2009 ruling by U.S. District Court Judge Paul Magnuson found that nearly all of Georgia's withdrawals from Lake Lanier, a massive federal reservoir north of Atlanta, are illegal because the lake wasn't built for water supply. The ruling has left Peach State leaders racing against the clock to avoid a potentially dire water shortage in the South's largest urban area. (AP Photo/Greg Bluestein, File)

ATLANTA (AP) - There are plenty of ways that Georgia can replace
water from Lake Lanier if a federal judge turns off the tap for
metro-Atlanta.

But most options are pricey. And none would provide water
quickly enough to meet a judge's 2012 deadline.

A new analysis from a task force created by Georgia Gov. Sonny
Perdue found it would take at least eight years to bring new
reservoirs online. And conservation measures alone won't make up
for 280 million gallons a day Atlanta will lose if its supply from
Lake Lanier dries up.

The findings place new pressure for Georgia to broker a deal
with neighboring Florida and Alabama. In July a federal judge found
Georgia had few rights to Lake Lanier. He gave them until 2012 to
work out their differences.

(Copyright 2009 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)


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