Come Home - Suppertime

By: Denise Bradberry Email
By: Denise Bradberry Email

One of the biggest draws to Brundidge is a play performed twice a year called, "Come Home at Suppertime."

The play’s been given the Governors Tourism Award this year and it’s been named the official folk life play of Alabama.

"Come Home at Suppertime" isn't just a play. It shares the stories of real people living in Brundidge during the depression.

Sherroll Tatum plays Uncle Ovie, an old Pike County farmer who couldn't read or write but kept a sense of humor during hard times.

"I just enjoy trying to bring back the old times of the 30’s," says Tatum.

In those times life was hard.

The scenes capture a small piece of Alabama's past.

"It preserves the history of our community and it preserves these people right on into the future," says Lenny Trawick, who wrote all the songs for the play.

"Every little town in South Alabama was like Brundidge. Everybody was poor and they had to work for a living. It's so much different now then it was then," says 85-year-old Tatum.

Links to the past can also be found in the theatre itself.
The building hasn't always been a theatre. In fact, it was once the home of city hall.

It was built in the 40’s by the Works Progress Administration to give people jobs during the depression.

It's now a piece of the story that keeps bringing people home at suppertime.

This year's fall production of "Come Home at Suppertime" opens on the 4th of November and runs for two weeks but unfortunately tickets have already sold out.

But if you want to reserve a spot no worries they do it again during both the spring and fall each year.


Comments are posted from viewers like you and do not always reflect the views of this station.
powered by Disqus
WTVY-TV 285 N Foster Street Dothan, AL 36303 334-792-3195
Copyright © 2002-2014 - Designed by Gray Digital Media - Powered by Clickability 33199624 - wtvy.com/a?a=33199624
Gray Television, Inc.