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This Day in History: 1st Woman in Space; 'Superman' Dies; "Psycho", "Grease" Open

By: AP
By: AP

Today in History
Today is Sunday, June 16, the 167th day of 2013. There are 198 days left in the year. This is Father's Day.

On this date:
In 1567, Mary, Queen of Scots, was imprisoned in Lochleven Castle in Scotland. (She escaped almost a year later but ended up imprisoned again.)
In 1858, accepting the Illinois Republican Party's nomination for the U.S. Senate, Abraham Lincoln said the slavery issue had to be resolved, declaring, "A house divided against itself cannot stand."
In 1883, baseball's first "Ladies' Day" took place as the New York Gothams offered women free admission to a game against the Cleveland Spiders. (New York won, 5-2.)
In 1903, Ford Motor Co. was incorporated.
In 1911, IBM had its beginnings as the Computing-Tabulating-Recording Co. was incorporated in New York State.
In 1933, the National Industrial Recovery Act became law with President Franklin D. Roosevelt's signature. (The Act was later struck down by the U.S. Supreme Court.) The Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. was founded as President Roosevelt signed the Banking Act of 1933.
In 1943, comedian Charles Chaplin, 54, married his fourth wife, 18-year-old Oona O'Neill, daughter of playwright Eugene O'Neill, in Carpinteria, Calif.
In 1962, The New Yorker published the first of a three-part serialization of "Silent Spring" by Rachel Carson.
In 1973, Soviet leader Leonid I. Brezhnev began an official visit to the United States.
In 1978, President Jimmy Carter and Panamanian leader Omar Torrijos (toh-REE'-ohs) exchanged the instruments of ratification for the Panama Canal treaties.
In 1987, a jury in New York acquitted Bernhard Goetz (bur-NAHRD' gehts) of attempted murder in the subway shooting of four youths he said were going to rob him; however, Goetz was convicted of illegal weapons possession. (In 1996, a civil jury ordered Goetz to pay $43 million to one of the persons he'd shot.)

Thought for Today: "Not to know is bad. Not to want to know is worse. Not to hope is unthinkable. Not to care is unforgivable." -- Nigerian saying.

On June 16th,
In 1965, the Herman's Hermits single "Mrs. Brown You've Got A Lovely Daughter" went gold.
In 1970, sponsors for Woodstock announced they lost more than $1.2 million dollars on the concert.
In 1975, John Lennon sued the U.S. government. He charged that officials tried to deny his immigration through selective prosecution.
In 1980, Bob Nolan, who helped found the Sons of the Pioneers, died at the age of 72.
In 1982, guitarist James Honeyman-Scott of The Pretenders died of a drug overdose. A day earlier, the band's bassist, Pete Farndon, had quit the band.
In 1989, a women's fragrance called "Smoke" entered the perfume market. Its creator was Smokey Robinson.
In 1992, rapper Sister Souljah called Democratic presidential candidate Bill Clinton a "draft-dodging," "pot-smoking" womanizer. He had criticized her for suggesting that blacks kill whites because there's too much black-on-black violence. She claimed she was misunderstood.
In 1995, Pearl Jam began a tour without using Ticketmaster. The band accused Ticketmaster of monopolizing the concert ticket industry and decided to use a mail-order ticket service instead.


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