Buddhist monks allowed to resume services for now

Buddhist monks will be allowed to resume worship services at a home in Virginia Beach while their lawsuit against the city is pending.

Buddhist monks and Myanmar activists from Burma Refugee Organization march through to Japan's embassy with carrying the portrait of slain Japanese journalist Kenji Nagai and flowers in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, Friday, Oct. 19, 2007. Nagai, 50, covering the Yangon protests for Japanese video agency APF News, was killed on Sept. 27, during a military crackdown on pro-democracy demonstrations around the Sule Pagoda in the capital. (AP Photo/Lai Seng Sin)

VIRGINIA BEACH, Va. (AP) - Buddhist monks will be allowed to resume worship services at a home in Virginia Beach while their lawsuit against the city is pending.

The monks filed a federal lawsuit last month after neighbors' complaints about traffic prompted the City Council to shut down the services. The monks also asked for a temporary restraining order that would allow them to resume services until the matter is resolved.

Rather than go to court to fight the restraining order, the city agreed to let the monks continue to hold Sunday services attended by no more than 20 people.

John Stepanovich, attorney for the Buddhist Education Center of
America, says it could be as long as a year before the lawsuit is decided.

(Copyright 2008 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)


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